Meet the new professor: Professional Inaugural Lecture Series

When: 
23 October 2018 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
Venue: 
UNSW GATE 9 The Chancellery - Council Chambers Kensington Sydney, NSW 2052

The 2018 Meet the new professor series is a wonderful chance for staff and students to celebrate the careers and achievements of our newly promoted and recruited professors. Our speakers will share their specialist knowledge and provide insights into ‘what’ and ‘who’ influenced their lives and careers.


Meet the New Professor: Engineering

Timings: Talks 3.30 - 4.30pm, followed by pizza and refreshments

Registration: Open from 2.45pm

 

Speakers

Professor Merlin Crossley Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Professor Richard Buckland

Professor Con Doolan

Professor Maurice Pagnucco, Deputy Dean

 

Professor Richard BucklandProfessor Richard Buckland

Professor Richard Buckland is an Associate Professor in Computer Security, Cybercrime, and Cyberterror at the University of New South Wales. His research areas in Learning and Teaching and Security Engineering. Currently he is working on non-mark based motivation in online education, and protocols for secure electronic elections in untrusted environments. Richard is the Chair of the Academic Board of the Australian Computer Society Education, a member of the UNSW Academic Board, the Director of First Year Studies and the Chair of the Skills Syllabus Group of the Scehool of Computer Science and Engineering at UNSW.

 

Lecture 1: The joy of teaching, modelling the strange connection between choice and concurrency with high dimensional abstract algebra, and love.

"How have we made exploring human curiosity, expanding our minds, and learning about ideas and the world around us a dull repetitive chore?” "Why don’t all students view going to class as a joy and something they long to experience?” These questions drove me to leave the easy life and become being underpaid overworked and utterly clueless teacher with ludicrous goals. This love letter to teaching and thinking explores lessons I’ve learned from my students about humanity, community, and the power of human connection. As a student the exhilarating joy I experienced for maths, puzzles, and computing was - in contrast - solitary, inwards, and largely private. Is this the essential nature of STEM, or an artefact of how we teach? There will be jokes and a song. Bring a pen and, if you wish, a trumpet.


Professor Con Doolan Professor Con Doolan

Professor Con Doolan obtained an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering and a PhD in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Queensland. After working at the University of Glasgow, Department of Defence (Australia) and University of Adelaide, he is now a Professor at the University of New South Wales, Sydney and leads the Flow Noise Group. His research is focussed on aeroacoustics, or the production of sound from unsteady fluid flow. Current projects include the control of airfoil noise using novel perforated and poroelastic materials, submarine noise, wind turbine noise and understanding the acoustics of supersonic, reacting flows.

 

Lecture 2: Quiet innovation from the edge of space to the bottom of the sea

Unwanted sound, or noise, is not only annoying, it is a health hazard; noise increases stress, causes hypertension, impairs educational development plus it is a problem for the military. Noise is commonly associated with jet aircraft and airports, but it is also a problem for wind turbines, undersea vehicles, and the future of space-launch systems. To develop new, quiet technology, we use specialist wind tunnels and computer models as well taking inspiration from nature for our designs. In this talk, I will summarise some of our achievements in understanding and controlling noise in wind turbines, submarines and high-speed jet engines.


PLEASE CHECK HOW TO ARRIVE TO VENUE

Location: The Chancellery, Council Chambers (C22), UNSW Sydney, Kensington.

Please see the UNSW Map here and Google map(The nearest entrance is Gate 9 off High St, and the nearest building is the Sir John Clancy Auditorium)

For more Information on how to get to UNSW please click here.

 

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