Solar CEO calls UNSW the “WEST POINT” of the Solar Army

Dr Shawn Qu, CEO and founder of the world’s third largest Solar PV Manufacturer, Canadian Solar, stated, “In this industry, the School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering at UNSW has the reputation of being the West Point of the solar army.  UNSW trains a lot of good researchers, good managers and good sales managers (LtoR) A/Prof CheeMun Chong, CEO of Canadian Solar Dr Shawn Qu, Scientia Professor Martin Green in the solar army and this solar army is making great contributions for the environment in every country.  It is helping to save the world.”

Canadian Solar has signed a collaboration agreement to work on the UNSW Advanced Hydrogenation Technology.   A/Prof CheeMun Chong (UNSW SPREE) said, “Canadian Solar stated that they don’t do a lot of collaborations so this is a milestone for them.”  A/Prof Chong continued, “The advanced Hydrogenation technology in this collaboration solves the light induced degradation problem in monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon solar cells.  We have industrial in-line tools that have been specifically developed by UNSW for implementing the advanced hydrogenation technology on monocrystalline silicon solar cells and we are currently working on developing the commercial tools for implementation on polycrystalline silicon solar cells.”

In this industry, the School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering at UNSW has the reputation of being the West Point of the solar army.

Dr Shawn Qu, CEO and Founder of Canadian Solar

Dr Qu will be sending the Canadian Solar senior research team to UNSW next month as the first step in the transfer of the advanced hydrogenation technology into the Canadian Solar production facility.  A/Prof Chong said, “Canadian Solar is one of the key market players in the polycrystalline solar cell space and as a NASDAQ listed Tier 1 PV Company is ideally positioned to maximise on this collaboration.”

The Advanced Hydrogenation Technology developed at UNSW eliminates the slow progression of power loss exhibited by silicon solar cells in modules over their 30-year lifetime.  This loss is a direct result of elements within the solar cell reacting together when exposed to sunlight.  “By treating the solar cell during the manufacturing process we make it so that these detrimental reactions cannot occur and this leaves us with a significant gain in the total energy delivered from the module over its lifetime”, added A/Prof Chong.

 

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